How it works:

An HDMI cable has two ends to it—one side plugs into your computer—the other end plugs into your tv.

On whether it works with your tv…..depends on the models…some started putting the plug-ins for video game systems years ago—others took longer to do.

Personally for us—our huge floor model big screen (that we bought used years ago) will not support an hdmi cable, but the other tv I bought 5 years ago does.

Easy way to check yours—buy a cheap HDMI cable and see if you can hook it up—it literally takes 2 minutes to do.

The HDMI port on your DVD player is probably just output

DVD *players* don’t have an imput – they’re just output. So what you were planning wouldn’t work. If you had a DVD burner, it might have an input, but probably only coax.
Very old TVs would only have Coax(cable) or Composite. Those you couldn’t connect to your computer. Slightly less old TVs might have a VGA or DVI inputs. Those you could connect using your normal computer VGA or DVI port. TVs that are newer still would probably have an HDMI input, which could be used with an HDMI cable.

You probably should check with the parent’s home owners because, as some like to say, your mileage may vary

Their particular policy may not allow it. Also let the parent’s know what you want to do, and you’ll have to to check their insurance or try PBC loans (USA). The insurance may allow it but the parents may not want their kids to have it for a variety of reasons.

In that particular video from VBN, the recipients had already promised it to their kids when they were debt free. Your friends may have a different reward in mind such as a special trip or new bikes, or … you get the idea. Your friends choice(s) need to be respected.

I know for us, when our dd was a kid, we would not have allowed a trampoline. Our dd has health concerns but wanted one. We told her to ask her cardiologist and orthopedic surgeon if it was okay and if they gave a thumbs up we would get one. Well I knew they wouldn’t so I could take this gamble. The cardiologist happened to be the first one we saw on the day of appointments. His first words were, “Absolutely not” but not for the reason I thought. He said the American Academy of Pediatrics has deemed them one of the most dangerous “toys” out there, or maybe the one that causes the most injuries. Something like that. Well, dd went on to ask the ortho surg. and he basically echoed what the pediatric cardiologist said for the same reasons. They both said regardless of physical problems in a kid they would not recommend it. (I thought they would not allow it only on the basis of her physical problems.)

I am not saying no kid should have one because it’s up to the parents. I don’t want to debate trampolines specifically. I am just passing on what we learned from 2 well educated doctors from the likes of Harvard and Texas Children’s Hospital.

It is great you want to bless someone else. Just make sure what you give is blessing and not a hardship.

I’m intrigued as well

Our TV is almost 25 years old, but our relatively new DVD player has an HDMI port on the back. So now I’m wondering if I can plug the computer into the DVD player, then have the DVD player feed the signal into the TV. In which case, yay!

I will say that

We just “purchased” another one of our favorite series last night, as streaming video from Amazon.com. “Flying Wild Alaska” is for all effects and purposes, how my DH grew up. And we have the first two seasons on DVD. But buying it as streaming video gave us access to the third season, way before it is available on DVD. The entire cost for the entire season was a grand total of $12.99, and we watched the first episode last night on his computer, basically the same way we’d watch a Youtube. It’s not available for streaming from Discovery Channel anymore, nor was it listed on Hulu as far as I could tell. But at $1.00 an episode, it’s a cheap date. The only downside is that if the computer monitor is smallish, it brings back memories of growing up with an itty-bitty TV screen. Also, we did occasionally have breaks in the streaming such that we got the buffering symbol as the DSL tried to restart the streaming. But all in all, it was a very nice way to get earlier access to one of our favorite shows. Just wish we could do the same thing with GoT.

Just as a cautionary note, prior to paying for it at Amazon.com, I did search for a free source. I thought I’d found one, but then his Windows 7 software threw up a warning screen that the download I was about to do apparently contained a virus, and did I really want to proceed? My copy of Windows XP may not have been sophisticated enough to generate a warning like that. So at this point, I’d steer clear of the apparent freebie TV websites. Sorta like kissing on the first date – you’re not really all that sure who that website really is and what they might have in mind. So, a mix of “neato” and caution this morning.

We have 2 of them and love them

There is ALWAYS something to watch, not like cable where we used to go through the channels and ask “why do we pay for this!”. My 11 year old grandson loves it. His mom has TW with HBO and he says our Roku is better. LOL!

As others pointed out, it does have its limitations. Most of what we want that’s not on there we find online and just stream through our laptop to the tv. I would never go back to cable. We’ve been using Roku for about 2 years.

I’m not going through Roku at all

I go from my computer, which has a screen darn near as big as our 20+ year old TV, and stream the episode directly from the Discovery Channel website. It’s very clunky, because the computer is located on a waist-high desk rather than on our TV stand, and we have to get up and actually manipulate the mouse on the desk rather than use the TV remote. There’s also the issue that if our DSL is slow that day, and it’s often slow, then we get skips and breaks and delays. It’s essentially like watching an episode via Youtube. But it beats the heck out of waiting a whole year for the series to come out on DVD, which is what we’re doing for GoT, since HBO apparently won’t let us stream from their website. It’s a minor annoyance, but I’d love to know if someone has figured out a way around that.

Here’s a very specific question

We ditched cable last year, and we’ve been generally pretty happy since then. We did get a digital converter to watch the Olympics last summer, but after all that high-tech hoopla, we didn’t like the signal and really didn’t like NBC’s coverage of the events, so we didn’t watch much of it. There are only a very small handful of shows or networks we wish we could get right now. The main network is the Discovery Channel, and the three non-Discovery Channel shows we want to watch are Game of Thrones on HBO, Vikings on the history channel, and Deadwood on whatever network that’s on. I’ve figured out how to do the streaming from the Discovery Channel’s website, so that part is covered. Tedious, but we can do it. Haven’t figured out yet how to get those other shows. Anyone using Roku, Hulu or Netflix or Amazon or whatever, to get those specific currently-running shows?

Roku has a one time cost of $40-89 depending on which model you buy

It runs off the internet, so you have to have that. If you don’t have internet, you can’t run Roku.

Roku runs off “channels.” SOME of those channels are live streaming (BYU TV, The Blaze TV, Wall Street Journal, BBC News, Al Jazeera….there’s likely a few more), but MOST are “pre-recorded” (Netflix, HuluPlus, etc.) All of the aforementioned (except for BlazeTV, NetFlix, Huluplus) are free. You can purchase streamed channels, but these are mostly games.

We use Roku in conjunction over-the-air antenna, antenna for live TV. Roku works with any type television (older standard def like we have, newer HD, or newest SmartTVs.)

You can take your ROKU box and plug it into any type television.

Roku just kicked off VideoBuzz which was a portal channel into YouTube, but allowed in Twonky, which (sort of) allows you to bounce your internet feed onto your larger TV.

If you are looking to replace cable with Roku, you need to decide what you can live without. You’re not going to find the Cooking Channel or Person of Interest on it. Ironically though, they do stream the Home Shopping Network 🙂

It has worked for us, but we were willing to eliminate cable/satellite and the option to “record” shows for later in order to not spend $67 a month on Dish network.